Session 4.3.4: WORKSHOP: Body of researcher

Track:
WORKSHOP: Body of researcher
What:
Workshop
When:
13:30, Sunday 9 May 2021 (1 hour 30 minutes)
Breaks:
Break    03:00 PM to 03:30 PM (30 minutes)
Where:
  Virtual session
This session is in the past.
The virtual space is closed.
Virtual space archived
Discussion:
3

Leader: Florencia Marchetti, CISSC, Concordia University, Canada

● Magdalena Olszanowski, Concordia University, Dawson College, Canada

● Katja R. Philipp, Université de Montréal, Canada

● Celia Vara, Concordia University and Universitat Jaume I (Spain)

How are our own bodies involved in our research practices? How do we conceptualize them? How far into others/ beyond ‘you’ does this body extend? How does this body feel/ sense/ move while doing research? Are there any specific sensory organs or parts more involved than others? Drawing from a diverse range of creative practices, this workshop proposes three different exercises to explore the involvement of the sensing body in our research. One of the exercises will focus on kinesthesia, with participants engaging in a corporeal exploration of stillness and movement. Another one, inspired by the surrealists’ exquisite corpse technique, will have participants drawing bodies, in its singular, already collective or in-between fragmented states, playing with the possibility of unconscious processes arising to the drawing surface. A third exercise will explore a collective mediated body and the gestural elements one performs while researching by using Zoom play: faux green screen, layering screenshots and backgrounds. Through the workshop, we will consider if ludic play is possible with/ through our computers and if so what modes of sensing/movement does it call for. After these exercises, all participants will be invited to collectively share and reflect on their findings.



Judge
CISSC, Concordia University
Project Coordinator, PhD Candidate
Instructor
Dawson College
Faculty
Instructor
Feminist Media Studio - Concordia University (Canada)

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