LSAC presenters have submitted these 10-minute videos. You can view them at any time before and during the conference. Each video has a chat area on the site where you can leave comments and feedback. Presenters are encouraged to check the site and respond to comments. Please note that there is no specific time in the schedule allocated to view these videos—you can watch them when you wish.

Best practices in Peer Tutoring

Supporting Academic Integrity: tutoring sessions focused on necessary skills

Best practices in Peer Tutoring
This 10-minute asynchronous presentation will describe how designated tutoring sessions to support students learning academic integrity skills have been incorporated into the tutoring service, both with subject tutoring and writing tutoring.The three sessions are directly booked by students, often referred to the Learning Centre by instructors and deans: Understanding and Awareness, Using Sources in Your Writing, Style and Formatting Guidelines.In these appointments, students build on previous understanding of academic integrity, learn about resources available, develop plans to continue their learning. Writing appointments also aid students to focus on developing paraphrasing skills and ability to use sources as evidence in writing assignments, how to find the formatting and style rules needed for assignments, as well as what aspects of the style and formatting are important in most college assignments.

Expanding the training: incorporating antiracism and social justice topics in optional tutor professional development

Best practices in Peer Tutoring
This 10-minute asynchronous presentation will outline a strategy for incorporating issues pertaining to equity, antiracism and social justice into tutor training and tutoring practices.Optional Paid professional development for tutors was offered to tutors beginning in the summer of 2020, allowing them to integrate four hours of paid professional development into their work each term. Goals include giving tutors opportunity to engage in crucial topics, lead and mentor their peers when bringing topics back to the team, and select topics based on other in-class learning. Peer tutors, as students, are being introduced to many of these concepts in their courses, and the professional development allows exploration of ideas that will feed their own academic pursuit, while strengthening the communication with students in tutoring sessions and bringing forward concepts that can be incorporated into the service.While the tutoring team is multicultural and reflects the student population at the institution, the tutor trainers are not a diverse group. Tutors are encouraged to seek out opportunities coming from diverse and racialized voices and tied into other study and interests.Expertise is shared across the team, as tutors are required to both reflect and to share resources with peers and tutor trainers.

Pivot Twice: Operationalizing student insight toward inclusive programming

Best practices in Peer Tutoring
In response to the pandemic, we pivoted an existing graduate writing program and co-created with grad students new virtual peer productivity programming in response to graduate student experience of distancing and lockdown. One student facilitator expressed insight on programming changes that could better serve diverse learners. We had to listen twice to get it right and ultimately facilitate a crucial shift in program design to create an expanded, tailored, and more inclusive environment. The result is serving marginalized grad students beyond our expectations. We intend to sustain both the design and the practice during and after the pandemic.

Best Practices for Embedding Tutors

Best practices in Peer Tutoring
Best Practices for Embedding TutorsAt the advent of moving off campus due to COVID-19 our Learning Center proposed placing a tutor in each of the classes marked for this transition. We subsequently developed the program into a robust embedded tutoring program for our first year classes. This has enabled us to reach students directly and support faculty in the process. We have created documents and best practices.

Supporting Peer Tutors

Leveraging Experience: Best Practices Essays

Supporting Peer Tutors
At my college, we utilize both professional and peer tutors. How can we best leverage the years of experience of our professional tutors to train new peers? Enter the Best Practices essays, wherein veteran tutors write about their most useful techniques, which become required reading for new hires. Inclusion of the Best Practices essays in the training manual has helped new tutors learn tutor pedagogy, learn more about their peers, and determine whom to go to with questions. At the same time, the experience of writing the essays has helped other tutors better understand their own strengths and feel more confident in the role of mentors.

Para-professional to Professional: Articulating the relevance of transferrable skills

Supporting Peer Tutors
In this presentation, we will discuss the skills the student staff in our Learning & Curriculum Support unit have developed in their academic support roles. As current Learning Peer Helpers, we recognize the importance of connecting our para-professional experiences to our future career aspirations. We will share results of a survey asking student staff to highlight the skills they deem most valuable for their future careers, strategies to support the development and articulation of skills, and current struggles in the online environment. We will suggest ways in which supervisors can further support their student staff in developing their transferable skills and preparing for life after graduation.

Team Building Remotely

Supporting Peer Tutors
The Learning Skills Services team at York University is fortunate to work with a group of work-study students called eLearning Skills Peers who provide peer-to-peer academic coaching support. In the pivot to remote learning and working from home, we have not had an opportunity to meet our current team of student staff face to face. In this presentation, we will highlight strategies that we have implemented to build a sense of community and connectedness amongst our peer team while working remotely as well as feedback from the peers about their experience.

Reinventing the Practical Nursing Peer Tutor Community: Building Connections & Moving Online

Supporting Peer Tutors
The move from a physical environment to a virtual environment altered how the Academic Success Centre at Bow Valley College could deliver Peer Tutoring services. This video will explore how the Practical Nursing Peer Tutor model was reinvented with a commitment to building an online community of learners (both between Peer Tutor/Peer Tutor and between Peer Tutor/Tutee). PN Peer Tutoring changed from drop-in study groups to a combination of bookable online appointments, an online peer-led workshop series and online study groups. Design, implementation and usage of virtual PN Peer Tutoring will be presented through a staff perspective, a peer tutor perspective and a student user perspective.

Creating a Rewarding Experience for Peer Helpers in an Online Environment: Tips From the Supported Learning Program at the University of Guelph

Supporting Peer Tutors
The remote nature of this past year has left many students feeling isolated and disconnected, and our SLG Leaders are no different. In order to maintain quality service delivery, as well as an energized, motivated and supportive team atmosphere, new strategies to build rapport, promote team-building, maintain engagement and foster a sense of connectedness and leader-to-leader support were used. This presentation will provide tips and tricks for creating a rewarding and supportive team environment in an online setting.

Learning Strategies

Learning Coach: Peer lessons in taking lecture notes

Learning Strategies
With the change to an online learning environment, many students have expressed difficulties with taking lecture notes. Some have depended on posted lecture videos and are reluctant to engage in active notetaking. Peer to peer learning seemed like a potential tool to reach hesitant first-year students and model principles and practices for online learning. Senior students trained as Learning Coaches are an essential part of the learning skills program, demonstrating academic strategies for success and referring to campus resources. We pivoted to produce an online notetaking lesson including a video demonstrating OneNote. Each session is a multi-pronged approach: we join the synchronous or asynchronous class to take lecture notes, and subsequently lead a workshop demonstrating note-taking options for diverse learners. We marketed the sessions to faculty across campus and have had positive responses in courses as diverse as music theory and sociology. Looking beyond the pandemic, we hope to expand and record sessions to increase access for students working in multiple time zones.

eCoaching: Using Video Campaigns to Engage Learners and Develop Academic Skill

Learning Strategies
In March 2020, COVID-19 forced NorQuest College to close down its campus including the Learner Centre in which Tutorial and Academic Coaching Services operates. We were no longer able to meet with students face-to-face for individual and group sessions. Although we quickly pivoted to an online model, students either didn't know we had transitioned online or had a hard time finding us online. We were presented with an opportunity to find an engaging way to connect with all students online, as well as a chance to think about how we could generate more interest in the coaching services we've developed over the years. The solution we came up with was a successful video campaign: twelve 1:30-minute YouTube videos delivered directly to all students in an e-newsletter three times a week within the first four weeks of Winter 2021. Each video focused on one strategy to develop an academic skill (like managing test anxiety) or support online learning (like tips for using BlackBoard). As a result, we connected with over 7,000 students who have viewed our videos over 5,500 times (and counting!). They've even left comments, emailed us with questions, or have finally been able to connect with us online.

Supporting student success and connection in an online environment through an adapted organizational strategy

Learning Strategies
Since the shift to remote learning brought about by the pandemic, a common concern I often hear voiced by students is the lack of spontaneous connection they are experiencing with their professors and a decline in interaction with their peers. Furthermore, when opportunities for connection are available, it can be difficult for students to organize their time and keep track of where they are supposed to be, particularly when various platforms are being used within an institution.To support students, it can be helpful to adapt the traditional weekly plan to include additional details. Additions can include the links for a student's synchronous classes, encouraging students to plan to complete asynchronous work during a professors office hours, and engage in regular study groups with peers. This quick tip video will provide an example of such an adapted weekly plan, resulting in a fulsome organizational document to support a student's success and connection in the virtual environment.

Fostering Metacognition in Online Learning

Learning Strategies
As an accessible, equitable and diverse curriculum becomes paramount to fostering excellence in higher education, so does the explicit and intentional support for learners during the acquisition of new knowledge, skills and attitudes. Many learners are unaware of their own thinking and learning processes and may even view their roles as passive, or perceive their journey as mostly dependent on uncontrollable variables. Moreover, the rapid shift to an online environment may have exacerbated both feelings of isolation and challenges related to mental and physical health/well-being. Metacognition (i.e., "thinking about thinking") helps students understand their experiences while empowering them to direct their own learning journeys.In the proposed quick-tip video, we will share a few tools that instructors can easily incorporate into their online and/or hybrid courses in order to foster metacognition and scaffold self-regulated learning strategies. We will offer ways to build metacognitive opportunities into synchronous and asynchronous courses that can be adapted to specific contexts. Demonstrations will be done on Canvas as well as Microsoft Teams, but the ideas will be easily adaptable to any other LMS or video conferencing tool used in other institutions.

The Student Guide to Remote Learning

Learning Strategies
As our York University community transitioned to study and work from home in spring 2020, our Learning Skills Services team worked quickly to transition existing services into a remote format and to build additional supports for remote learning. In response to feedback from our students and campus partners, we developed an asynchronous resource called the Student Guide to Remote Learning to complement our existing synchronous workshops, appointments, and drop-in services. This presentation will provide an overview of the development process and a tour of the resource.Resource Link: https://www.yorku.ca/scld/remote-learning/

Setting CAST Goals to Boost Success

Learning Strategies
In this strategy-sharing video, we will describe a framework for setting studying goals grounded in self-regulated learning theory and research. CAST goals (McCardle et al., 2017) focus on individual study sessions (e.g., an online lecture/seminar, reading for a course, studying for an exam, etc.) and include four components: content (what course concepts, ideas, etc. to focus on while studying), actions (how to work with or process the content), standard (a concrete measure of progress), and time parameters (time and length of the study session). CAST goals are beneficial because they prompt learners to engage in planning, metacognitive monitoring, and adaptation all key ingredients to achieving success in any learning context. CAST goals are also adaptable to learners needs and to different tasks (e.g., learners may need to focus on setting fewer and/or smaller goals just to get started). When learners begin to accomplish their goals, this can build a sense of efficacy, which can motivate them to persist. In the video, we will briefly discuss the benefits of CAST goals along with tips to support learners using this framework.

Student Success and Engagement

Engaging Students in Non-Credit Learning Opportunities – Using Digital Badges to Incentivize and Recognize Participation in Academic Skill Development

Student Success and Engagement
Engaging students in non-credit learning opportunities with academic support units can be an ongoing struggle, clever marketing and the promise of free food only go so far! Academic support units offer services and expertise that all students can benefit from, yet tend to see only a fraction of the student population, many of whom seek help because they are struggling and/or have been required by other institutional mechanisms to engage. How can academic support units make the case to all students that there is value to be gained from engaging in the support offered?Digital badges, a type of micro-credential, offer a free, flexible, and relatively easy approach to incentivizing and recognizing student learning. As a Learning Strategist who does not specialize in educational technology, I will discuss my previous experiences with implementing a digital badging program and current efforts to develop a digital badging program specific to the support provided through the Academic Success Centre at the University of the Fraser Valley. Best practices in micro-credentialing, lessons learned, and current opportunities / challenges will be discussed. A discussion board will provide the opportunity to share resources, ideas, and ask questions.

Procrastination Avoidance Week: A Cross-Institutional Collaboration Brought to you by COVID

Student Success and Engagement
Taking advantage of the necessity for remote learning across the country, my co-presenters (Julia Lane of SFU and Sandra Smith from UFV) and I saw a unique opportunity to adapt the Late Night Against Procrastination event offered by many institutions into a collaborative, cross-institutional (and as national as possible) week-long program. How did it go? Who knows?! As I write this, we are still in the early stages of planning, but whatever happens, we will report back to you, and we will include our take-aways for those who wish to be the next to boldly venture into this uncharted territory.

Helping international students succeed by better understanding how they cope

Student Success and Engagement
All learners use coping strategies to navigate the complexities of their university studies. For international students, these complexities can be especially challenging. Many international students facilitate positive learning experiences by developing and implementing effective coping strategies. This video reports on a research project that identified coping strategies used by international students at a UK university. Constructed data pointed to coping strategies including finding familiarity, building support networks, working it out later, and leading community action. The video brings to the fore the importance of coping strategies to a successful experience of learning, strongly suggesting that pedagogical approaches be re-imagined to identify coping strategies during teaching practice to lead to the planning and implementation of interventions that foster effective coping.

Building an Online Study Community through weekly Podcasts

Student Success and Engagement
The sudden transition to online learning last spring has brought with it a number of challenges for academic staff and learning developers. One of the biggest challenges identified at the University of Glasgow relates to the raised difficulty of student engagement, with a sense of loss of community being experienced by staff and students alike. How can a sense of community, previously evolving quite naturally in the physical space of the classroom, be achieved in an online learning environment? This video will present a possible answer to this question and introduce the podcast format developed by the Effective Learning Advisers for International Students at the University of Glasgow. It will discuss the podcasts connection to classes, its structure (or lack thereof) and how it allows students to review the themes learned about during the week. This will be followed by a short presentation of a podcast snippet. The video will finish by discussing student feedback and invite a discussion on whether and how the podcast format might continue once face-to-face teaching is allowed again on campus.

Helping students Bounce Back at the University of Windsor

Student Success and Engagement
The BounceBack program at the University of Windsor is modelled after the Thriving In Action curriculum developed by Dr. Deena Kara Shaffer and Dr. Diana Brecher at Ryerson University. The program is a series of 8 workshops that focuses on holistic thriving skills and academic strategies, with the intent to help students bounce back from a semester where they did not perform as well as they had expected. We are in the second full academic term since the COVID-19 pandemic began, and our preliminary information suggests that the demand for our program has increased, despite the changes to our program structure and delivery. We propose a 10-minute pre-recorded presentation to speak about how the University of Windsor has successfully pivoted the BounceBack program to an online format, while continuing to provide the same level of support to students that need it.